Skip Navigation, or press ALT and K together and then press enter.Welcome to the OMC website. This site has been developed for both the visually impaired and non visually impaired. If you would like to use the visually impaired version of this site please go to omc.gov.ie/viewtxt.asp, or press ALT and I together and then press enter

Irish Child Health Database - Peer Reviewed Papers

Database Search


You are here: Irish Child Health Database » Study Papers » Descriptive Studies - With a comparative dimension: time, geography, treatment, procedures » Epidemiology - descriptive, incidence, prevalence and/or trends
  • Epidemiology of traumatic brain injury in children receiving intensive care in the UK

    Published in:

    Arch Dis Child, Vol: 90, Page: 1182-7

    Publication Date:

    November 2005

    Aims & Objectives:

    The aim of this study was to examine the epidemiology of children with traumatic brain injury admitted to paediatric intensive care units in the United Kingdom

    Abstract:

    AIMS: To describe the epidemiology of children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) admitted to paediatric intensive care units (PICUs) in the UK. METHODS: Prospective collection of clinical and demographic information from paediatric and adult intensive care units in the UK and Eire between February 2001 and August 2003. RESULTS: The UK prevalence rate for children (0-14 years) admitted to intensive care with TBI between February 2001 and August 2003 was 5.6 per 100,000 population per year (95% Poisson exact confidence intervals 5.17 to 6.05). Children admitted to PICUs with TBI were more deprived than the population as a whole (mean Townsend score for TBI admissions 1.19 v 0). The commonest mechanism of injury was a pedestrian accident (36%), most often occurring in children over 10. There was a significant summer peak in admissions in children under 10 years. Time of injury peaked in the late afternoon and early evening, a pattern that remained constant across the days of the week. Injuries involving motor vehicles have the highest mortality rates (23% of vehicle occupants, 12% of pedestrians) compared with cyclists (8%) and falls (3%). In two thirds of admissions (65%) TBI was an isolated injury. CONCLUSIONS: TBI in children requiring intensive care is more common in those from poorer backgrounds who have been involved in accidents as pedestrians. The summer peak in injury occurrence for 0-10 year olds and late afternoon timing give clear targets for community based injury prevention.

    Authors:

    R. C. Parslow; K. P. Morris; R. C. Tasker; R. J. Forsyth; C. A. Hawley

    Study Type:

    Study Papers » Epidemiology - descriptive, incidence, prevalence and/or trends » Descriptive Studies - With a comparative dimension: time, geography, treatment, procedures

    Notes:

    UK Paediatric Traumatic Brain Injury Study Steering Group Paediatric Intensive Care Society Study Group

    Categories:

    traumatic brain injury

    International Classification:

    Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes - injury

    Keywords:


    Geography:

    Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom (UK and Ireland)