Skip Navigation, or press ALT and K together and then press enter.Welcome to the OMC website. This site has been developed for both the visually impaired and non visually impaired. If you would like to use the visually impaired version of this site please go to omc.gov.ie/viewtxt.asp, or press ALT and I together and then press enter

Irish Child Health Database - Peer Reviewed Papers

Database Search


You are here: Irish Child Health Database » Study Papers » Qualitative Studies » Qualitative Study
  • Teenage kicks: Young women and their involvement in violence and disorderly behaviour

    Published in:

    Child Care in Practice, Vol: 11, Page: 341-356,Taylor & Francis

    Publication Date:

    2005

    Aims & Objectives:

    This study draws upon research into young people's attitudes to and experiences of violence and disorder in Northern Ireland, but focuses specifically on the views of young women and explores their experiences and knowledge of violence and disorder

    Abstract:

    The issue of young people's involvement in forms of violence and anti-social behaviour is one that is generating increasing concern across Northern Ireland. Young people are frequently regarded as one of the primary sources of social disorder and are often blamed for provoking fear and a sense of insecurity among elder members of the community. However, in much of the recent writing and in most of the policy responses to problems of anti-social behaviour, there is an inappropriate use of the term "young people", which effectively functions as a gloss for "young males". Young women are implicitly included in the concept of "young people as problem" but are effectively excluded from policy considerations, which largely focus on dealing with young men. This paper draws upon research into young people's attitudes to and experiences of violence and disorder in Northern Ireland, but focuses specifically on the views of young women and explores their experiences and knowledge of violence and disorder. The paper considers how far young women's concerns are being acknowledged and questions how far the needs of young women can be accommodated or the risks some of them pose are being addressed by subsuming them within the broader category of "young people". (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved) (from the journal abstract)

    Authors:

    Neil Jarman

    Study Type:

    Study Papers » Qualitative Study » Qualitative Studies

    Notes:

    1357-5279 Accession Number: 2005-13242-005. First Author & Affiliation: Jarman, Neil; Institute for Conflict Research, Belfast, United Kingdom. Other Journal Title: Child Care in Practice. Release Date: 20060522. Publication Type: Journal, (0100) Peer Reviewed Journal, (0110). Media Covered: Print. Media Available: Electronic; Print. Document Type: Journal Article. Language: English. Major Descriptor: Antisocial Behavior; At Risk Populations; Communities; Human Females; Violence. Classification: Behavior Disorders & Antisocial Behavior (3230) . Population: Human (10) Male (30) Female (40) . Location: Northern Ireland. Age Group: Adolescence (13-17 yrs) (200) Adulthood (18 yrs & older) (300) Young Adulthood (18-29 yrs) (320) . Methodology: Empirical Study; Qualitative Study; Quantitative Study. References Available: Y.

    Categories:

    violence; attitudes to and experiences of

    International Classification:

    War, violence and conflict

    Keywords:


    Geography:

    Northern Ireland (Northern Ireland)