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Irish Child Health Database - Peer Reviewed Papers

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You are here: Irish Child Health Database » Study Papers » Descriptive Studies - With a comparative dimension: time, geography, treatment, procedures » Epidemiology - descriptive, incidence, prevalence and/or trends
  • A survey of the prevalence of stereotypy, self-injury and aggression in children and young adults with Cri du Chat syndrome

    Published in:

    J Intellect Disabil Res, Vol: 46, Page: 133-40

    Publication Date:

    February 2002

    Aims & Objectives:

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and frequency of stereotypy, self-injurious behaviour and aggression in children and adults with Cri du Chat syndrome

    Abstract:

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and frequency of stereotypy, self-injurious behaviour (SIB), and aggression in children and adults with Cri du Chat syndrome (CCS), and to investigate the relationship between SIB, aggressive behaviour and stereotypy in these individuals. Sixty-six families of children and adults diagnosed with CCS completed the Behaviour Problems Inventory. Additional information relating to gender, chronological age, type of school/post-school occupation and medication was also included in the survey. Stereotyped behaviour was reported for 82% of subjects, more than half the sample displaying it on a daily basis. The occurrence percentage of 15 topographies of SIB suggested that head banging, hitting the head against body parts, self-biting and rumination are the most frequently occurring behaviours in CCS. Aggressive behaviour was reported for 88%, with a statistically significant negative correlation between age and the number of aggressive behaviours reported. The present findings suggest that specific types of stereotypy and SIB are observed frequently in CCS.

    Authors:

    M. S. Collins; K. Cornish

    Study Type:

    Study Papers » Epidemiology - descriptive, incidence, prevalence and/or trends » Descriptive Studies - With a comparative dimension: time, geography, treatment, procedures

    Categories:

    self-injurious behaviour; Cri du Chat syndrome

    International Classification:

    External causes of morbidity and mortality - Intentional self-harm - self-injury

    Keywords:


    Geography:

    Northern Ireland (Northern Ireland)